How To Move To Ireland To Work, Live, or Study

If a life of Guinness, live music, and never-ending sarcasm is calling you, then read on for ways in which you could claim Irish citizenship.

The island of Ireland is comprised of 2 parts, the North which is part of the U.K and Ireland which is an independent republic. If you want to move to Ireland you need to understand a little about the country itself and if you have Irish ancestry how you can move to Ireland.

If you were born in Ireland, the UK or in the EEA (The European Economic Area (EEA, comprises the member states of the European Union, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway) you have some claim on residency rights in Ireland.  For example if you were born in Northern Ireland (officially the UK) you have automatic rights to live in or move to Ireland. UK citizens also have the right to move to Ireland without any conditions or restrictions.  If you were born in the North of Ireland or your parents were you have automatic rights to reside in Ireland. If you were born outside of Ireland but your parents were born in Ireland again you have right to live in or move to Ireland.

EEA and Swiss nationals can move to Ireland with their family members but there are some limits. EEA and Swiss nationals and their families can remain in Ireland for up to 3 months without restriction. If you are retired and plan to stay more than 3 months, you must have sufficient resources and health insurance, or you must be employed or self-employed.

Non-EEA nationals: citizens of certain non-EEA countries must apply for an entry visa before they travel to Ireland. You can find out if you need a visa to enter Ireland. When you have arrived in Ireland, if you are not an EEA or Swiss national, you must have permission to remain if you wish to stay for more than 3 months. So for example if you are a Canadian or US citizen you can stay in the country for 3 months (90 days) without a Visa. You can also move to Ireland if you are Canadian or American but you will have to find employment that is needed in Ireland to do so.

Non-EEA nationals can become employed in Ireland and apply to stay but certain conditions of employment must be met. There are certain employment areas that are required in Ireland and you can obtain a residency permit if these are undertaken you can find more information here.  So for example if you are an engineer, doctor, scientist and so on you can probably find work and obtain a residency permit.

If you are retired and have a pension and the financial resources you can move to Ireland as a retiree. The financial threshold is around €50,000 per person per year, but you must also prove you have access to a lump sum of money to cover unforseen expenses. This should be the equivalent to the price of purchasing a house in the U.S or around $250,000. In addition you have to register with the local immigration officer following your arrival.

If you are a student who wishes to study in Ireland you must prove you are enrolled in a recognized program and that you have sufficient funds to support yourself while you are in the country. This is around €7000 per year of study. You can work while you are a student but it must be in a “casual” labour type position of around 20 hours per week.

The following information details how to claim Irish citizenship through birth or ancestors.

Born in Ireland

If you were born on the island of Ireland before 1 January 2005, you are entitled to be an Irish citizen.

Irish citizen parents

If you were born in Ireland after 1 January 2005 and your parent(s) were Irish citizens, then you are also an Irish citizen.

Foreign national parents

A child born in the island of Ireland on or after 1 January 2005 is entitled to Irish citizenship if they have a British parent or a parent who is entitled to live in Northern Ireland or the Irish State without restriction on their residency. A child born in Ireland to a parent who has been granted refugee status is also automatically entitled to Irish citizenship.

Born outside Ireland

Irish citizen parents born in Ireland

If either of your parents was an Irish citizen who was born in Ireland, then you are automatically an Irish citizen, irrespective of your place of birth. If you are an Irish citizen, you can apply for an Irish passport. You do not need an Irish passport in order to be an Irish citizen but having an Irish passport is evidence that you are an Irish citizen.

Irish citizen parents born outside Ireland

If you were born outside Ireland to an Irish citizen who was born outside Ireland, then you are entitled to become an Irish citizen.

If your parent or parents has Irish citizenship in another way, for example, through marriage, adoption or naturalisation, and was an Irish citizen at the time of your birth, you can become an Irish citizen.

Claiming Irish citizenship: Before you can claim Irish citizenship, you must have your birth registered in the Foreign Births Register.* If you are entitled to register, your Irish citizenship is effective from the date of registration – not from the date when you were born.

Citizenship through descent from Irish grandparents

If one of your grandparents is an Irish citizen who was born in Ireland, but neither of your parents was born in Ireland, you may become an Irish citizen. You will need to have your birth registered in the Foreign Births Register.*

*Irish Foreign Births Registration

The following table may help to explain the situation:

A

If you are: Born in the island of Ireland on or before 31 December 2004

Then you are: Entitled to Irish citizenship or you are an Irish citizen

B

If you are: Born on the island of Ireland on or after 1 January 2005

Then you are: Entitled to Irish citizenship if one or both of your parents:

·         Is Irish

·         Is British or entitled to live in Northern Ireland or the Irish State without restriction on their residency

·         Is a foreign national legally resident in the island of Ireland for 3 out of 4 years immediately prior to your birth

·         Has been granted refugee status in Ireland

C

If you are: Child of A, born outside the island of Ireland

Then you are: An Irish citizen

D

If you are: Child of C and a grandchild of A, born outside the island of Ireland

Then you are: Entitled to Irish citizenship, but you must first register in the Foreign Births Register

E

If you are: a child of D and a great-grandchild of A, born outside the island of Ireland

Then you are: Entitled to Irish citizenship, by having your birth registered in the Foreign Births Register, but only if your parent D had registered by the time of your birth.

 

Originally written by Faith Coates via www.xyuandbeyond.com